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Growth of computer science in to basic science

information technology, computer science, computing , evolving ,calculating , semi conducter production,

GROWTH OF COMPUTER SCIENCE IN TO BASIC SCIENCE:

As it is known ,Computer science has gradually evolved over many decades. While in the starting it was dominated by mechanical calculating machines, today’s computers have evolved into a finite automation that realizes a Milling Machine, using design and architecture originally proposed by von Neumann.

This model provides for a very general purpose machine capable of addressing problems across all human activities. The great microprocessor revolution, large-scale and super-efficient semiconductor production, huge growth in primary and secondary storage, and high-speed networking and switching capacity have dramatically changed the way end-users look at computers and computer networks to day.

The enormous computational power now available has led to a situation where computers are regularly used to solve fundamental problems across physical, chemical, biological, engineering, medical and social sciences and also in all other academic disciplines.

There are plenty of examples to prove the point. As the following examples show, many of these will be impossible without computers.

The theorem which was proved thro 'Computer:
The ‘Four Color Conjecture,’ originally posed in 1852, was one of the first mathematical theorems to be proved through computational means. Using 1,200 hours of high-speed computers, Kenneth Appel and Wolfgang Haken of the University of Illinois solved the conjecture in 1976.

Computer aided Tomography:
• Allen Cormack of Tufts University, US, and Godfrey Hounsfield of EMI, England, got their 1979 Nobel prize for physiology and medicine for inventing Computer Aided Tomography (CAT).

COMPUTER CHESS CHAMPION :
• IBM’s ‘Deep Blue’ supercomputer “defeated” chess champion Gary Kasparov in May 1997.

DIGITALLY DESIGNED BOEING 777:
• On September 2002, Boeing announced the launch of its 777 series of aircraft that were “100% digitally designed.”

HUMAN GENOME:
• On April 14, 2003, a major milestone was reached in biological sciences with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome.

QUICK SORT ALGORITHM:
Legendary Oxford professor Sir Tony Hoare, winner of the 1980 ACM Award (the equivalent of the Nobel prize in computer science) invented the ‘Quick Sort’ algorithm, used billions of times every day by millions of computers around the world.

MILLION BOOK DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECT:
Professor Raj Reddy, founder-director of the Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, referred to his ‘Million Book Digital Library Project.’ He outlined the challenges of automated classification, machine translation, natural language processing, speech, summarisation and ‘mining’ of large volumes of text to discover ‘hidden patterns.’

APHASIA PROJECT TO HELP COGNITIVE DISORDER TO PROCESS WORDS:

Professor Maria Klawe, dean of engineering at Princeton university, shared details of the ‘The Aphasia Project,’ in which she and her researchers are designing hand-held devices that combine images, text and sound to address the special needs of people with cognitive disorder which affects a person’s ability to process words.

ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGES OF SLEEP APNEA:
Dr Dan Ling, vice-president, Microsoft Research, talked of projects that focus on mobile phones and their interaction with human beings. A particularly interesting project is the one addressing the challenges of patients affected by ‘sleep apnea.’

The talks demonstrated that research in computer science is moving beyond the study of a set of ‘computing machinery.’ Just as mathematics and physics have matured into fundamental sciences, computer science, too, is graduating into one.

CONFUSION:
But the scientific community confuses the study of computer science with the acquisition of IT skills leading to well-paying jobs, and often laments that computer science is “killing” other basic sciences.

We do need good physicists, chemists, material scientists and mathematicians.

Computer science, if properly approached, will nourish the growth of every other science, be it astronomy, space science, nuclear science, biological science, materials science, or health science.


C.EASHWER(1 ISOLU)
SINGAPORE
Published: 2006-04-02
Author: Chockalingam Eswaramurthi

About the author or the publisher
Iam a Professional writer dedicated to sharing the knowledge on topics of Public interest, be it Management , Leadership , Social service , World Politics , Personalities , Industries , Health , Computers , Policy making , Governments , Book review etc., Iam from Singapore . My e mail id is : eashwer@pacific.net.sg

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